In life, some things are sure. People are born, people die. Day and Night will come everyday and it is also sure that N’Golo Kante and his cleat will start for Chelsea if he’s fit. The 26 year old continued his fairy tale story of his career after he was nominated for the 2017 Ballon D’Or, just four years after playing in Ligue 2.Report from the Guardian covers that the Frenchman is currently out for three weeks or a month after suffering an hamstring complaint while on international duty with France, and his absence throws a lot of questions for manager, Antonio Conte.

The Italian manager has always had Kante available ever since his move from Leicester last year and his absence means that a shift in formation or playing personnel is inevitable. Chelsea struggled badly in the last game against Manchester City, as the Pep Guardiola tutored side overwhelmed the Chelsea team with their beautiful movement and positional fluidity. Kante struggled to impose himself on that game after shining in the 2-1 away win at Atletico Madrid. Conte has switched to three at the back ever since the 3-0 drubbing at Arsenal a year ago, as Chelsea romped to the title with 93 points with a record 30 wins, while you can also be winning at the winner free bet as the Blues will look to defend the Premier League title this 2017/18 campaign.

Chelsea have flirted with 3-5-1-1 this season to accomodate Tiemoue Bakayoko who has sat deep and allowed Kante to roam forward, displaying the sort of forward runs that saw him rise to global appeal at Leicester. The likes of Willian and Pedro have struggled to impress following the change in formation as Eden Hazard has been preferred to play in the hole behind Alvaro Morata, who is also out injured with the same hamstring complaint. Last season, the likes of Tottenham and Manchester United negated our tactics by pressing high up the pitch and maybe the absence of Kante can ensure Conte tries a new style of football that is sure to confound opponents.

Kante’s injury could well turn out to be a blessing in disguise.

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